This App Has Not Been Scientifically Shown to Improve Your Vision | The Body of Evidence

This App Has Not Been Scientifically Shown to Improve Your Vision

Age-related visual impairment affects a lot of people and it can be quite distressing, I imagine, to realize you are slowly losing your ability to see the world.

Rehabilitation can help, as can assistive devices, but of course one needs to be careful when the accompanying claims sound too good to be true.

An app called "Ultimeyes" was accompanied by the claim that it was scientifically shown to improve vision. Not so, says the Federal Trade Commission, an American agency tasked with protecting consumers.

“This case came down to the simple fact that ‘Ultimeyes’ promoters did not have the scientific evidence to support their claims that the app could improve users' vision,” said Jessica Rich, Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection. “Health-related apps can offer benefits to consumers, but the FTC will not hesitate to act when health-related claims are not based on sound science.”

You can read the full release from the FTC here.

Remember: if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Thanks to Dr. Aaron Johnson for the heads up!